Focus Statistics

Useful Websites

Statistics Websites David C. Howell: By the author of Statistical Methods for Psychology. Includes handouts for his lectures and links to many other useful statistics sites. David A. Kenny: Contains information on mediation, moderation, meta-analysis, structural equation modelling and much more. SPSS Tutorial Videos: From Central Michigan University showing how to set up an SPSS data file and conduct a wide number of tests. Discovering Statistics: By Andy Field (author of Discovering Statistics Using IBM SPSS Statistics). Contains handouts and podcasts relating to his lectures on a large number of statistical topics. Statistics for Psychology: A site put together by Ian Walker to accompany the second year undergraduate statistics module taken by psychology students at the University of Bath, England. The site contains screencasts showing how to perform various SPSS procedures and reference notes on various statistical topics. Free Statistics Software
Andrew F. Hayes: Useful software for performing various advanced statistical techniques, including PROCESS: an SPSS add-on for performing moderation, mediation, and conditional process analysis, implementing procedures which avoid some of the problems with the Baron and Kenny causal steps approach. BrightStat: Allows people who don’t have access to SPSS to conduct t-tests, ANOVAs, correlational analyses, multiple regression and many more types of analysis. GPower 3: Statistical software for calculating statistical power and effect sizes from researchers at Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf. JASP: A free package for conducting traditional and Bayesian statistical analysis which is undergoing continuous development. The package uses an SPSS style Windows interface and provides very user-friendly output but currently does not allow data manipulation (such as data editing, and split file and select if commands). The package currently gives descriptive statistics and performs procedures such as ANOVA, ANCOVA, binomial tests, chi-square tests, correlation analysis (Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall), exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, linear regression, log-linear regression, logistic regression, Mann-Whitney tests, reliability analysis, structural equation modelling, t-tests, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and provides tests of assumptions and effect size statistics. John F. Crawford: Provides access to a a number of useful programs from a professor at Aberdeen University. For example, DEPCOR and INDEPCOR calculate the significance of differences between non-zero correlation coefficients. List of Free Statistical Software: A listing of links to a large number of free statistical packages. Many of the packages are rather advanced but some are useful for behavioural and social scientists with more modest statistical skills. PSPP: A free software package that aims to be similar in use to SPSS and which can run SPSS data and syntax files. In the absence of SPSS, this package is very useful for performing analyses such as: computing descriptive statistics, t-tests, Pearson’s r, chi-square, ANOVA, bivariate linear regression (but currently not multiple regression), logistic regression, cluster analysis, Cronbach’s alpha, exploratory factor analysis, Cochran’s Q, Friedman’s tests, Kendall’s W, Mann- Whitney tests,Wilcoxon tests, sign tests, McNemar tests and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. Note though, that some of the options available in SPSS for the more advanced analyses are currently unavailable in PSPP. R: A free (open source) statistical environment in which different statistical analysis packages can be installed and then used. Packages performing most of the functions that SPSS performs (and many more) are available for download. Using the environment involves a very steep learning curve, with many analyses being performed using syntax, although the R Commander package provides some functionality via a Windows-based point and click interface.For people without access to packages such as SPSS, SAS or Mplus who need to to perform reasonably sophisticated statistical analyses, the R environment together with a book such as Discovering Statistics Using R by Field, Miles and Field ((2012) is a reasonable choice.
Statistical help for students in the UK
© John Charlton 2013 - 2020
Home | About | Contact | Ts & Cs | Useful Websites
This page contains descriptions of, and links to, websites that I hope people will find useful. In addition to containing much useful statistical information, some of the sites contain links to videos showing how to perform various statistical analyses. I have also included sites providing free statistical software. Go to a site by clicking its name.
Focus Statistics

Useful Websites

This page contains descriptions of, and links to, websites that I hope people will find useful.
Statistics Websites David C. Howell: By the author of Statistical Methods for Psychology. Includes handouts for his lectures and links to many other useful statistics sites. David A. Kenny: Contains information on mediation, moderation, meta- analysis, structural equation modelling and much more. SPSS Tutorial Videos: From Central Michigan University showing how to set up an SPSS data file and conduct a wide number of tests. Discovering Statistics: By Andy Field (author of Discovering Statistics Using IBM SPSS Statistics). Contains handouts and podcasts relating to his lectures on a large number of statistical topics. Statistics for Psychology: A site put together by Ian Walker to accompany the second year undergraduate statistics module taken by psychology students at the University of Bath, England. The site contains screencasts showing how to perform various SPSS procedures and reference notes on various statistical topics. Free Statistics Software
Andrew F. Hayes: Useful software for performing various advanced statistical techniques, including PROCESS: an SPSS add-on for performing moderation, mediation, and conditional process analysis, implementing procedures which avoid some of the problems with the Baron and Kenny causal steps approach. BrightStat: Allows people who don’t have access to SPSS to conduct t-tests, ANOVAs, correlational analyses, multiple regression and many more types of analysis. GPower 3: Statistical software for calculating statistical power and effect sizes from researchers at Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf. JASP: A free package for conducting traditional and Bayesian statistical analysis which is undergoing continuous development. The package uses an SPSS style Windows interface and provides very user-friendly output but currently does not allow data manipulation (such as data editing, and split file and select if commands). The package currently gives descriptive statistics and performs procedures such as ANOVA, ANCOVA, binomial tests, chi- square tests, correlation analysis (Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall), exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, linear regression, log-linear regression, logistic regression, Mann-Whitney tests, reliability analysis, structural equation modelling, t-tests, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and provides tests of assumptions and effect size statistics. John F. Crawford: Provides access to a a number of useful programs from a professor at Aberdeen University. For example, DEPCOR and INDEPCOR calculate the significance of differences between non-zero correlation coefficients. List of Free Statistical Software: A listing of links to a large number of free statistical packages. Many of the packages are rather advanced but some are useful for behavioural and social scientists with more modest statistical skills. PSPP: A free software package that aims to be similar in use to SPSS and which can run SPSS data and syntax files. In the absence of SPSS, this package is very useful for performing analyses such as: computing descriptive statistics, t-tests, Pearson’s r, chi-square, ANOVA, bivariate linear regression (but currently not multiple regression), logistic regression, cluster analysis, Cronbach’s alpha, exploratory factor analysis, Cochran’s Q, Friedman’s tests, Kendall’s W, Mann- Whitney tests,Wilcoxon tests, sign tests, McNemar tests and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. Note though, that some of the options available in SPSS for the more advanced analyses are currently unavailable in PSPP. R: A free (open source) statistical environment in which different statistical analysis packages can be installed and then used. Packages performing most of the functions that SPSS performs (and many more) are available for download. Using the environment involves a very steep learning curve, with many analyses being performed using syntax, although the R Commander package provides some functionality via a Windows-based point and click interface.For people without access to packages such as SPSS, SAS or Mplus who need to to perform reasonably sophisticated statistical analyses, the R environment together with a book such as Discovering Statistics Using R by Field, Miles and Field ((2012) is a reasonable choice.
Statistical help for students in the UK
In addition to containing much useful statistical information, some of the sites contain links to videos showing how to perform various statistical analyses. I have also included sites providing free statistical software. Go to a site by clicking its name.
© John Charlton 2013 - 2020